Use of self-administered Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) is not a valid means of identifying inpatients at risk for malnutrition on the Clinical Teaching Unit.

Adam Rahman ; Erin Spicer

Volume 2016: (1)Page 9-11
DOI: https://doi.org.10.22433/2016/09/3

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  • Rahman, A. (2016). Use of self-administered Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) is not a valid means of identifying inpatients at risk for malnutrition on the Clinical Teaching Unit.. 2016: (1), 9-11. Retrieved from http://canadianjournalofnutrition.ca/article/use-of-self-administered-malnutrition-universal-screening-tool-must-is-not-a-valid-means-of-identifying-inpatients-at-risk-for-malnutrition-on-the-clinical-teaching-unit/

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Abstract

Background:

Evidence exists validating self-administration of the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) to screen for risk of malnutrition among outpatients, but the validity of self-screening by inpatients has not yet been demonstrated. The goal of this study was to determine the validity of self-screening with the MUST as a means of identifying inpatients at risk for malnutrition.

Methods:

Audits of all patients admitted to the London Health Sciences clinical teaching units (CTU) were conducted over a 5-day period in 2015. Patients eligible for participation provided signed consent. Patients screened themselves using the MUST before the health care provider (HCP) (who was blind to the patient’s self-screen results) did. Each participant completed an ease-of-use questionnaire.

Results:

125 hospitalized patients were considered for enrolment, of which 65.6% (82/125) were excluded on the basis of a cognitive impairment or a physical impediment that prohibited informed consent or safe participation, respectively. A total of 17 inpatients (13.6%) were enrolled, ten of who completed the MUST and generated a risk score.  Agreement between self-screening and HCP-screening was 70%.

Conclusions: 

Owing to the cognitive and physical impairments among the CTU population, self-screening using MUST is neither a practical nor safe means of identifying those at risk for malnutrition.

Ø  The authors declare no conflict of interest

ØAdam Rahman, MD MSc. (EPID) FRCPC1,2,3,  and Erin Spicer MD2

1Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. 2 Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada. 3Program of Experimental Medicine, Western University Department of Medicine.

Ø  Corresponding Author: Adam Rahman, MD MSc (EPID) FRCPC, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Western University adam.rahman@sjhc.london.on.ca, 268 Grosvenor St. London, Ontario, N6A 4V2, Room B0-689, St. Joseph’s Health Centre

© Rahman et. al. This is an open access journal distributed under the terms of the Creative Common License BY NC

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  • Rahman, A. (2016). Use of self-administered Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) is not a valid means of identifying inpatients at risk for malnutrition on the Clinical Teaching Unit.. 2016: (1), 9-11. Retrieved from http://canadianjournalofnutrition.ca/article/use-of-self-administered-malnutrition-universal-screening-tool-must-is-not-a-valid-means-of-identifying-inpatients-at-risk-for-malnutrition-on-the-clinical-teaching-unit/

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